Everything You Need to Know About RFC Forms

POSTED BY Jon Corra . October 02, 2018

One of the most important aspects to consider when pursuing a Social Security Disability claim is whether or not the individual making the claim is capable of working. One of the ways in which the Social Security Administration (SSA) evaluates your ability to work is via a Residual Functional Capacity Assessment, commonly known as an RFC.

Your impairment(s) and any related symptoms, such as pain, may cause physical and mental limitations that affect what you can do in a work setting. Your Residual Functional Capacity is the maximum amount of work you can still do despite your limitations. The Social Security Administration (SSA) will assess your Residual Functional Capacity based on all the relevant evidence in your case record.

For instance, if you have an issue with your back, the RFC will measure how much you can still do despite your back problems, such as how long you can stand, walk or sit, or how many pounds you can lift.

Your physical RFC determines whether you can be expected to do sedentary work, light work, or medium work. For instance, if your doctor has restricted you to walking and standing no more than two hours per day, your RFC will be for sedentary work. Here are the various exertional levels that could appear in your RFC:

  • Sedentary work. This means you have the ability to lift no more than 10 pounds at a time, and occasionally lift or carry things like files or small tools. A sedentary job requires the ability to sit for 6 hours out of your 8-hour work day and stand or walk for no more than 2 hours of your 8-hour work day.
  • Light work. This means you can lift up to 20 pounds occasionally, and frequently lift or carry up to 10 pounds. Light work requires the ability to stand or walk for 6 hours out of your 8-hour work day. If you can do light work, you can do sedentary work.
  • Medium work. This means you can lift up to 50 pounds at a time, and frequently lift or carry up to 25 pounds. Medium work requires the ability to stand or walk for 6 hours out of your 8-hour work day.  If you can do medium work, you can also do light and sedentary work.
  • Heavy work. This means you can lift up to 100 pounds at a time, and that you can frequently lift or carry up to 50 pounds. Heavy work requires the ability to stand or walk for 6 hours out of your 8-hour work day.  If you can do heavy work, you can do medium, light, or sedentary work.
  • Very heavy work. This means you can lift objects that weigh more than 100 pounds, and frequently lift or carry 50 pounds or more. Very heavy work requires the ability to stand or walk for 6 hours out of your 8-hour work day.  If you can do very heavy work, you can do all the other levels as well.

Your RFC will also include any non-exertional restrictions, such as not being able to stoop, bend, crawl, use your fingers, or remember instructions. Among non-exertional restrictions is your ability to function because of nervousness, anxiety, or depression.

This may seem confusing, especially if you’ve never filed a Social Security Disability claim before. It can be daunting to submit all of the forms, file appeals, and go to hearings. These are just some of the reasons why so many people turn to our team for help with their Disability claims. We’ve helped thousands get the disability benefits they deserve. If you’d like to know more about the services we offer, call us for a free consultation. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you’d rather talk at a later time, fill out this form. A member of our team will set up an appointment so you can talk to us at your convenience.

For Your Reconsideration

POSTED BY Jon Corra . September 27, 2018

You’re probably already aware that the Social Security process can be a lengthy one. There’s also a good chance you’ve heard that most people who apply for Here Is What You Need To Know About Compassionate Allowancesdisability are denied at least once. But do you know what happens after that initial application is denied? What should you do next? What is the next step?

If your initial application is denied, which is frequently the case, and you have a disability which keeps you from working, what should you do?  It’s simple: you file an appeal called a Request for Reconsideration. The most important thing to remember about the Request for Reconsideration is that it must be filed within sixty (60) days of the initial denial. Filing a Request for Reconsideration can be a simple process. The form, officially called Form SSA-561-U2, can be picked up in person at your local SSA office, or you can get a copy online via the SSA website at SSA.gov.

In addition to the Reconsideration paperwork, you will also be required to complete the Disability Report. This is officially referred to as Form SSA-3441-BK. The last form which must be submitted is another Authorization to Disclose Information to the SSA (Form SSA-827).

All of these forms must be filled out completely in order to be effective. Be sure to review your denial letter, too. The denial letter will include the correct address to send your appeal to. We recommend sending the Request for Reconsideration via certified mail to help ensure the SSA receives your paperwork.

In addition to the forms listed above, you will also want to strengthen your case. This includes submitting any new and material medical evidence that the SSA doesn’t already have. In addition to traditional medical evidence, be sure to submit any non-traditional evidence like headaches, panic attack, or seizure journals to the SSA.

The Request for Reconsideration goes to the Disability Determining Section (DDS), which is a state agency that is involved with making disability decisions at the Initial and Reconsideration levels in a claim.  Although DDS will also make the decision on your Request for Reconsideration, your claim will be assigned to a different Disability Examiner to make this decision.

Once DDS receives your Request for Reconsideration, they will begin to gather updated medical evidence and review your claim again.  On average, it can take DDS 3-6 months to make the Reconsideration decision.  Unfortunately, most claims at this point are still denied. Some estimate as many as 75% of Social Security Disability applications are denied at the Reconsideration level.

This is just one aspect of the Disability process, and it can seem overwhelming. It’s one of the many reasons why so many people turn to Jan Dils, Attorneys at Law. If you’d like to know more about what our firm can do for you, call us today for a free consultation. Our number is 1-877-526-3457. If you’d rather talk at a later time, fill out this form so our team can contact you at a time that is best for you.

Resources and Your Social Security Disability Claim

POSTED BY Jon Corra . July 26, 2018

Many people aren’t aware of the differences between Social Security Disability (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). While there are many differences between the two programs, the most significant difference pertains to income and resources.

Supplemental Security Income is a need-based program. Social Security Disability is based on your work credits. If you have a lot of resources, your SSDI claim won’t be impacted.

However, since SSI is income-based, your resources could impact your claim. Many SSI applicants find the rules about resources confusing. To clarify some of the most common misconceptions about resources, we compiled a list of tips and we’re sharing some of our best advice from the past 24 years.

What is a resource?

According to the SSA, a resource is something that you own, such as cash, bank accounts, land, life insurance, personal property, vehicles, and anything else you own that could be exchanged for cash.

SSI Resource Limits

If you’re single, the Social Security Administration states that you can’t have more than $2,000 in resources. However, not all resources count against you. We’ll explain more about resources that don’t count against you later. If you’re married, the limit is raised to $3,000. This is the same regardless of whether one or both spouses are disabled.

What Resources Don’t Count for SSI?

  • The house you live in
  • One vehicle, if it is used for transportation for you or a member of your household
  • Life insurance policies you own with a face value of $1,500 or less per person
  • Burial plots or spaces for you or your immediate family
  • A burial fund of up to $1,500 each for you and your spouse’s burial expenses
  • Household goods and personal effects
  • Property you or your spouse use in a trade or business, or on your job if you work for someone else
  • If you are disabled or blind, money or property you have set aside under a Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS)

If you are over the resource limit, you will not be eligible for SSI. Since SSI is based on need, many people won’t have to worry about a lot of the issues with resources.

However, because of how nuanced the SSA rules are pertaining to resources, it can be confusing. That’s one of the reasons why so many people seek the help of attorneys like Jan Dils, Attorneys at Law. We have the knowledge to help individuals navigate the Social Security maze.

Call us today for a free consultation. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you’d rather talk at a different time, fill out this form so our Intake team can schedule you for a later date.

 

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Long Term Disability and Your Social Security Disability Claim

POSTED BY Jon Corra . July 16, 2018

Working every day in Social Security can be en eye-opening experience. Some of the stats we’ve learned over the years are staggering. For instance, did you know 25% of all 20-year-olds won’t work until retirement age? In 2017, 39% of all working Americans had no money saved.

So, what are you to do if you can’t work? If you become disabled at an early age and you have no savings, it may be difficult to survive financially.

If you decide to pursue Social Security Disability, you’re going to be in for a long wait. Some people prepare for this by purchasing long-term disability insurance (LTD). However, individuals who have LTD may have questions about how it impacts Social Security Disability.

Let’s start with an explanation of long-term disability insurance. For most, an LTD policy will take place after a short-term disability policy ends. Most short-term policies last about 6 months. According to insure.com, long-term disability insurance pays a percentage of your salary, usually 50 to 60 percent, depending on the policy. The benefits last until you can go back to work or for the number of years stated in the policy. Some policies pay out as long as you are disabled until age 65.

Many employers offer LTD insurance policies, but you must opt into these policies. If your employer does not offer a plan, you can purchase LTD through an insurance agent. Most LTD policies require a monthly fee.

If you’ve done any research on the Social Security Disability process, you know that it takes a long time for claims to be approved. Most people have to wait years before they get approved. Long-term disability insurance can be beneficial during this time because it does not take as long for an LTD claim to process. So, LTD can help supplement your income while you’re waiting to be approved for SSDI.

Can you get both  SSDI and long-term disability policy? 

One of the first things we’re asked when a client has an LTD policy is “Can I get both?” The answer depends upon a few factors. Keep in mind, SSDI is not an income-based program. There are Many myths regarding Social Security. The SSA does not care how much money or how many assets you have when you’re pursuing SSDI.

You could have 27 houses and every Ferarri ever made and still qualify for SSDI. In other words, the income you receive from an LTD policy won’t keep you from receiving benefits. The limitations are usually found in your LTD policy. Some LTD policies require you to file for SSDI within a specific time period.

Once you’re approved for SSDI, most long-term disability policies won’t continue to pay you the full amount. Instead, the policy will offset the balance paid by the SSA.

For example, if you were making $60,000 per year before you became disabled, and your policy paid you 60% of your annual income, you’d receive about $2,500 per month. If you’re approved for SSDI for an amount of $1,800 per month, your LTD policy should pay you the remaining $700 per month. Keep in mind though, this depends upon your LTD policy. Some policies may not pay anything if you’re approved for SSDI.

Know your long-term disability policy.

Regardless of whether your employer offers an LTD policy or you purchase one from an agent, you should get to know it well. Don’t hesitate to ask your HR rep about specifics, or reach out to your insurance agent for clarification on the details.

If you’d like to know more about the ways in which SSDI impacts long-term disability, call us today for a free consultation. Our number is 1-877-526-3457. If you’d rather talk at a later time, fill out this form so we may call you at a better time.

What Everyone Needs to Know About Social Security Disability Video Hearings

POSTED BY Jon Corra . June 29, 2018

When you’re pursuing a Social Security Disability claim, your hearing is one of the most important aspects of the entire process. We understand that a lot of our clients prefer to attend a hearing in person.

There’s a certain level of comfort that comes with attending a hearing in person. However, there’s not always an Office of Hearings Operations (OHO) close by. When an OHO location isn’t close, a video hearing makes a lot of sense. Here are 5 reasons why you should embrace your Social Security disability hearing video.

 

Travel time.

If you live in a large metropolitan area, there’s a good chance you live near an OHO office. However, we’re based in West Virginia. A lot of our clients live in rural areas, and they often have to travel long distances in order to attend hearings in person.

For instance, many of our clients near our Beckley, WV office were forced to travel over two hours in order to attend an in-person hearing at the Roanoke, VA OHO. Now that we’re able to complete Social Security disability  video hearings at our Beckley office, what was once a four-hour round trip can be done by driving a few minutes to our office.

Less anxiety.

We understand that most of our clients haven’t hired a social Security attorney before and they haven’t been in court. Though an ALJ hearing isn’t like something you’d see on an episode of Law and Order, it can still be intimidating.

When you attend a hearing via video conference, your anxiety may be reduced because you’re not in the same room as the ALJ.

Plus, if you’re attending a video hearing at a local SSA office, or at a location like our Beckley, WV office, you won’t have to search for a parking place and walk a considerable distance in order to arrive at the OHO. That’s not usually an issue when you have a video hearing.

Quicker hearing.

One of the biggest benefits of a Social Security disability hearing video is scheduling. The SSA can often schedule a hearing for a video conference much quicker than they can for an in-person hearing. This is a big benefit considering the backlog the SSA is currently facing. The quicker you can attend a hearing, the quicker you can get a decision.

Better for individuals with limited mobility.

 Individuals with severe disabilities or those who have mobility concerns may have issues when traveling long distances for an in-person hearing. The video hearing offers an alternative for applicants who can’t travel far because of their disabilities.

It’s not much different.

It may seem like a Social Security disability hearing video is a big change from a traditional in-person hearing, but in all actuality, it’s not that different. Other than looking at a camera and a video monitor, the procedure is the same. Your social security attorney won’t prepare you much differently than if you were attending the hearing in person.

The judge will act the same as he or she would if you were attending the hearing in person. The questions and overall procedure don’t differ either.

Overall, the Social Security disability hearing video is a good alternative to an in-person hearing. They’re quicker, easier to get to, and great for individuals with limited mobility. However, if you would rather attend a hearing in person, we understand. We present our clients with both options, and we let the client make the decision.

If you’d like to know more about the services we offer, or if you’d like a free consultation, call us today. Our number is 1-877-526-3457. If you’d rather be called at a later time, fill out this form so our Intake team can call you at a later time.

Here Is What You Need To Know About Compassionate Allowances.

POSTED BY Jon Corra . June 18, 2018

To say the Social Security Disability process is long is an understatement. It takes years for most claims to get approve and People get paused with useless Social security Myths. However, there are some exceptions to the rule.

The SSA recognizes certain conditions and disabilities in which expedition occurs. Formally, this list of conditions is known as Compassionate Allowance.

What is a Compassionate Allowance?

According to the SSA, Compassionate Allowances are a way to quickly identify diseases and other medical conditions that, by definition, meet Social Security’s standards for disability benefits.

These conditions primarily include certain cancers, adult brain disorders, and a number of rare disorders that affect children. The Social Security Compassionate Allowance List (CAL) initiative helps the SSA reduce waiting time to reach a disability determination for individuals with the most serious disabilities.

Which conditions are on Social Security Compassionate Allowance List?

There are over 200 conditions on the CAL. The list contains many types of cancer as well as terminal diseases. The full list can be viewed here: https://secure.ssa.gov/poms.nsf/lnx/0423022080

It’s important to note that a diagnosis alone is not necessarily enough to qualify for the Compassionate Allowance expedition. For instance, breast cancer is on the list, but the severity of the condition also plays a part. In order for breast cancer to qualify for the list, it must be inoperable with distant metastases.

 

How can you file for a condition on the Compassionate Allowance List?

As long as your medical evidence backs up your disability claim, it will be expedited. However, one aspect that may hold up your claim is medical records. Your medical records may be held up by delays at your medical office. However, once your records are sent, you should receive an expedited decision.

Unfortunately, even the Compassionate Allowances program can’t provide benefits immediately. Even with the expedited process, several factors such as the number of other applications, the speed of submitted medical evidence, and further required examinations can delay the decision.

However, most applicants do not have to wait long for their payments to start — most receive Compassionate Allowance benefits anywhere from a few weeks to 2 months after the application is received.

Overall, filing a disability claim while battling a condition on the Compassionate Allowance List can be difficult. If you’d like to know more about how to file for these claims, give us a call today for a free consultation. Our number is 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form so we may call you at a better time.

 

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What Social Security Applicants Should Know About Back Pay

POSTED BY Jon Corra . May 29, 2018

You are likely aware of the Social Security backlog, and how frustrating a Social Security claim can be. However, you may not know that the approval process can be somewhat complicated, too.

Unfortunately, you don’t receive an approval and then get paid the next day.

In this blog, we are going to examine some key points to the approval process, when you should expect payment and some situations that could catch you by surprise.

When Will I Get My Social Security Back Pay?

Social Security Applicants and  Social Security Back Pay. For some people, back pay can make a huge difference in their lives. It’s understandable that our most of our clients are justifiably curious about the date that they will receive their back pay.

On average, back pay time frame is  90-120 days for the back pay to be processed and released to you give application as Social Security Applicants. It may be sooner or later than the average, depending upon your specific claim.

So, why is there such a discrepancy? Generally, an individual with a smaller back pay amount won’t have to wait as long for their back pay to arrive as someone with a significant amount.

For instance, when a claimant is owed a large sum, their check can require up to three signatures before it’s released from the payment center.

Also, SSA may need certain information from you in order to process your payments, such as household financial information, or your Workers Compensation payment information.

The longer it takes SSA to receive this information, the longer it will take to get your payments processed and released.

Waiting Period

You may be surprised to learn that there is a mandatory waiting period applied to SSDI claims.  According to the Social Security Administration, you must be disabled for five months after your disability onset date before you can start receiving SSDI payments.

Your benefits will start at the beginning of the sixth month. This won’t delay benefits for most claimants, because most people won’t be approved until long after their onset date.

It’s important to realize that disability benefits will not be paid during the waiting period.

Lump sum or payments?

If you are approved for SSI, or a combination of SSI and SSDI, the rules are different. Social Security generally pays the back pay benefits for SSI or combined SSI/SSDI in three installment payments that are separated by six months each.

However, if you need additional funds sooner than they are scheduled to be released to you, you can contact SSA and ask that they release these funds to you early.

When you do this, be prepared to tell SSA why you need the funds early and provide proof of how much you need.

An SSI recipient may also be eligible for one lump-sum payment if they are not expected to live past the next 12 months or are no longer eligible for SSI monthly benefits at the time they receive their back pay (and are not expected to become eligible for benefits within the next 12 months).

For more information, read our article on lump-sum payments of back pay.

As you’re already aware, getting to the point at which you start receiving back pay can be a long and frustrating process.

It can be helpful to seek the advice of someone who knows the procedure. A lot of people choose Jan Dils Attorneys at Law because of our experience.

To learn more about the services we offer, call us today for a free consultation from our experience Social security attorney. Our number is 1-877-JanDils (1-877-526-3457.) If you can’t talk now, fill out this form, and a member of our team will call you at a better time.

How The New Medical Cards Will Impact You

POSTED BY Jon Corra . May 21, 2018

Individuals who receive Medicare are likely accustomed to paper cards, which can cause issues with information security. However, change is coming. Medicare recipients in West Virginia will be among the first individuals to receive the new cards. Here is what to expect:

Safety is paramount with the new Medical cards. The former paper cards featured your Social Security Number. This could be troublesome for many because it left important personal information exposed. The new Medical cards no longer feature an individual’s Social Security Number. Each new card will feature a new, unique Medicare Number. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will remove Social Security Numbers from all Medicare cards by 2019.

The new Medical cards will not be released at the same time to all Americans. Instead, they will be released in waves. West Virginia will be a part of the first wave released, which started in April of 2018. Other states included in wave one are Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and the District of Columbia.

The new Medical cards will be automatically sent via the United States Postal Service. Recipients won’t need to do anything to receive the new card. However, the CMS states that you should make sure your address is up to date. The CMS also states your benefits will not change with the new card. They also point out that the mailing will take time, and that your friends and neighbors may receive their cards before you do. The mail can be unpredictable, and the high volume of new cards being shipped can take a while to process.

Paper Medical Card

You may wonder why the Medical cards will remain paper. The simple reason is that, while a plastic card may be more durable, paper cards are easier for medical providers to make copies of. If you forget your card though, the provider may be able to look up your information by way of the new number.

If you’re in a Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO or PPO), your Medicare Advantage Plan ID card is your main card for Medicare—you should still keep and use it whenever you need care. However, you may also be asked to show your new Medicare card, so you should carry this card, too.

When you receive your new card, you should properly dispose of your old card. To see an example of the new card, click here.

If you’d like to know more about the services we offer, or if you’d like a free case evaluation, call us today. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form so we may call you at a better time.

Common Communication Barriers for Social Security Applicants

POSTED BY Jon Corra . May 14, 2018

Common Communication Barriers for Social Security Applicants
Open communication with your medical professional can make a big difference in your social security case.

Tibetan political leader Lobsang Tenzin once said, “Communication will bring understanding and understanding will cause harmonious mutual relationships which can establish peace and stability.”

It’s safe to assume Tenzin wasn’t talking about your Social Security Disability claim when he said this, but his advice is applicable to pursuing a Social Security claim. Many disability claims fail due to a lack of communication. There are two main areas in which Social Security claimants fail to communicate:

1) Communication Issues with Medical Professionals

Medical evidence is one of the most crucial parts of any case. In fact, medical evidence is what will prove your disability. Medical evidence is created when you visit a medical professional.

He or she is able to document your condition(s) and make medical decisions based on any number of tests, lab results, and referrals.

However, none of this can happen if you don’t effectively explain your symptoms to your doctor. Many people don’t like going to the doctor, which can cause stress that results in a failure to properly communicate their symptoms. It’s referred to as communication apprehension.

According to James McCroskey, communication apprehension is the broad term that refers to an individual’s “fear or anxiety associated with either real or anticipated communication with another person or persons.” At its heart, communication apprehension is a psychological response to the evaluation.

At our core, we fear the doctor because we associate doctors and hospitals with death. We may withhold information from a doctor because we subconsciously believe nothing bad will happen to us if we don’t tell them what’s wrong.

Sometimes people are embarrassed to tell a medical professional about their conditions. That’s understandable, but try to remember that doctors, nurses, and medical professional have seen and heard it all. There are not many things you can tell them they haven’t seen or heard before.

2) Communication Issues with Legal Professionals

While communication apprehension is a big problem for medical professionals, attorneys can experience the same issue with their clients.

Most people who haven’t practiced law or worked in a professional setting have a predetermined image of attorneys, developed after years of popular daytime television shows and crude caricatures who were made famous by their 15 minutes of fame.

You may be surprised to learn that attorneys are people just like any others. At Jan Dils, Attorneys at Law, our clients are comfortable with us because we know how complicated the process is, and we make sure to explain it every step of the way.

 

We work hard to gain each client’s trust. We want them to be open with us so we can help them get the benefits they deserve. The only thing worse than communication apprehension is no communication at all.

A disability claim takes a long time— it often takes more than 2 years for a hearing to be scheduled. So, when that hearing is finally scheduled, we need to prepare. This includes scheduling pre-hearings, gathering updated medical records, and making sure you’re in attendance. We can’t do any of that if we can’t get in touch with you.

On some occasions, clients have lost cases because they weren’t aware that they needed to attend a hearing. Our firm does make every effort possible to contact our clients when we need to speak with them.

We call, send emails, send letters, and even search social media sites to make contact with our clients. To prevent this issue, make sure you update your phone number and address with your attorney if you move or change phone numbers.

Don’t let a lack of communication impact your case. We make it easy for our clients to stay in touch with us. You can call us, send an email, leave a message with our answering service after hours, report updates via our websites, and you can even message our Facebook page.

We’ve proven that we will do whatever it takes to stay in contact with our clients. Now it’s time to learn what else can do to help you get the benefits you deserve. Call us today for a free consultation at 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form so we can contact you at a more convenient time.

5 Awful Social Security Myths

POSTED BY Jon Corra . May 04, 2018

Since 1994, we’ve helped thousands of people get the social security disability benefits as Social Security disability benefits lawyers they deserve.  Throughout the years, we’ve also heard a lot of questions from clients that originate from Social Security Myths.

There is a lot of information available online about Social Security disability. However, some of it isn’t quite true. This blog covers some of these Social Security Myths and explains why they are not accurate.

 Myth 1:

  • You will get rich on Social Security disability.

This is not true, it’s a Social Security Myths . Your Social Security disability benefit amount is based on the amount of income5 Awful Social Security Myths on which you have paid Social Security taxes over your lifetime.

So, the higher your income was throughout the years you worked, the more you will receive per month.

Most Social Security disability recipients receive between $700 and $1700 per month, and the average for 2018 is $1,197. For 2018, the SSI maximum benefit amount is $750 per month, and the SSD maximum benefits amount is $2,788 per month.

Social Security Myths 2:

  • You shouldn’t pursue Social Security disability and VA disability at the same time.

Many Veterans wait to pursue Social Security until their VA disability claim is decided, or vice versa, worrying that one claim will hinder the other. This is not true another  Social Security Myths.

While both are disability claims, they are handled by two different administrations. The Social Security Administration handles Social Security claims, while the Department of Veterans Affairs processes VA disability claims. There is no evidence to show that pursuing both types of claims at the same time will hurt either case.

Both VA disability and Social Security disability take a long time. So, if a VA claim takes 4 years to get approved, and a Social Security claim takes 3-4 years, you could be waiting nearly a decade for an approval on both if you wait to file for one until the other is finished.

Also, many of the medical records you need for Social Security can be used by the VA, and vise versa. Law firms like ours that handle both types of claims can submit records to both the VA and Social Security.

Myth 3:

  • Young people can’t get Social Security disability.

For the most part, it is more difficult for a younger person to get approved than a person who is nearing retirement. Just because it’s more difficult, however, doesn’t mean that it’s impossible for a younger person to get approved for Social Security disability.

The important thing to keep in mind is that the SSA wants to know if you are disabled and if that disability keeps you from working. Some disabilities will stop a person from working regardless of age.

Myth 4:

  • An attorney can’t help you get your benefits.

This is simply not true. There are a lot of things an attorney can do to help you with your claim. An attorney can help you file paperwork, pursue appeals, and also represent you in court. Many attorneys request and review medical records as well.

However, the best thing an attorney can do for someone pursuing Social Security disability is help guide them through the process. Social Security is confusing. It helps to have someone work with you who has been through the process before.

While we’re on the subject of myths, a lot of people believe an attorney can help get you approved faster. That’s not true either. Claimants who have hired an attorney follow the same processes and time frames as those who do not have an attorney.

Myth 5:

  • Disability benefits only exist for those who have worked.

This is only true if you’re pursuing a claim for Social Security disability. This program is based on your work history. However, another program exists for those who are disabled and have no work history.

It’s called Supplemental Security Income, or SSI for short. The SSA pays monthly benefits to people with limited income and resources who are disabled, blind, or age 65 or older. Blind or disabled children may also get SSI.

 

 

Social Security is a tough process. But finding the right attorney doesn’t have to be. Call us today for a free consultation from experts Socail Security and Personal injury lawyer. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form so we can contact you at a better time.