Effective Communication and Your Social Security Claim

POSTED BY Jon Corra . October 22, 2018

Dinesh Paliwal was once quoted as saying “Collaboration is a key part of the success of any organization, executed through a clearly defined vision and mission and based on transparency and constant communication.” This quote reinforces the importance of communication in business, and we agree. Our firm believes in strong communication with our clients. Here are just a few of the ways in which we keep our clients informed:

  • Case Managers

Case Managers are one of the most important ways we keep our clients informed. Our Case Managers are specially trained to assist our Social Security clients with their cases. In fact, our Case Managers are the main point of contact for our clients, spending a majority of their days giving clients updates about their cases. They are also an incredible source of knowledge. Since Disability cases can take such a long time, many of our clients develop personal relationships with their Case Managers. Our Case Managers keep their clients up to date in several ways:

  • Phone Calls

Our Case Managers make and receive phone calls throughout the day. Our clients are welcome to call our office when they have a question or need to report a medical update. Every client has two Case Managers. So, if you call, there is a good chance you will get to talk to one of your Case Managers. However, if you don’t, you can leave a voicemail, and one of your Case Managers will call you back within 24 business hours.

What if you need to let us know what’s going on after hours? No worries. You can leave a message with our answering service. They will take your message and make sure it is delivered to the Case Management Team.

  • Email

If you prefer, our team can communicate with you via email. When you sign up for representation, your Case Managers will introduce themselves to you via phone. At that time, they will provide you with their contact number and their email address. However, if you need a reminder, you can always find their email address here.

 

  • Website

In addition to phone and email, our website offers additional options for contacting our Case Managers. You can use our online chat, which is monitored around the clock. When you correspond with the chat service, the message is relayed to our Case Managers, so they can return your calls and/or update your file.

If you need to report a doctor’s visit, a trip to the emergency room, or even update your contact info, you can do so by visiting our website. We have a section on jandils.com where clients can quickly update us about this information. Our forms are simple to use and make submitting information easy. You can use this feature by clicking here.

Effective communication is paramount in a successful Social Security Disability claim. We know our clients will worry less if they are better informed about their cases.

If you’d like to know more about the services we offer, or if you’d like to sign up for a free consultation, call us. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you’d rather talk at a later time, fill out this form. Once submitted, a member of our team will reach out to you to set up a consultation.

For Your Reconsideration

POSTED BY Jon Corra . September 27, 2018

You’re probably already aware that the Social Security process can be a lengthy one. There’s also a good chance you’ve heard that most people who apply for Here Is What You Need To Know About Compassionate Allowancesdisability are denied at least once. But do you know what happens after that initial application is denied? What should you do next? What is the next step?

If your initial application is denied, which is frequently the case, and you have a disability which keeps you from working, what should you do?  It’s simple: you file an appeal called a Request for Reconsideration. The most important thing to remember about the Request for Reconsideration is that it must be filed within sixty (60) days of the initial denial. Filing a Request for Reconsideration can be a simple process. The form, officially called Form SSA-561-U2, can be picked up in person at your local SSA office, or you can get a copy online via the SSA website at SSA.gov.

In addition to the Reconsideration paperwork, you will also be required to complete the Disability Report. This is officially referred to as Form SSA-3441-BK. The last form which must be submitted is another Authorization to Disclose Information to the SSA (Form SSA-827).

All of these forms must be filled out completely in order to be effective. Be sure to review your denial letter, too. The denial letter will include the correct address to send your appeal to. We recommend sending the Request for Reconsideration via certified mail to help ensure the SSA receives your paperwork.

In addition to the forms listed above, you will also want to strengthen your case. This includes submitting any new and material medical evidence that the SSA doesn’t already have. In addition to traditional medical evidence, be sure to submit any non-traditional evidence like headaches, panic attack, or seizure journals to the SSA.

The Request for Reconsideration goes to the Disability Determining Section (DDS), which is a state agency that is involved with making disability decisions at the Initial and Reconsideration levels in a claim.  Although DDS will also make the decision on your Request for Reconsideration, your claim will be assigned to a different Disability Examiner to make this decision.

Once DDS receives your Request for Reconsideration, they will begin to gather updated medical evidence and review your claim again.  On average, it can take DDS 3-6 months to make the Reconsideration decision.  Unfortunately, most claims at this point are still denied. Some estimate as many as 75% of Social Security Disability applications are denied at the Reconsideration level.

This is just one aspect of the Disability process, and it can seem overwhelming. It’s one of the many reasons why so many people turn to Jan Dils, Attorneys at Law. If you’d like to know more about what our firm can do for you, call us today for a free consultation. Our number is 1-877-526-3457. If you’d rather talk at a later time, fill out this form so our team can contact you at a time that is best for you.

Resources and Your Social Security Disability Claim

POSTED BY Jon Corra . July 26, 2018

Many people aren’t aware of the differences between Social Security Disability (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). While there are many differences between the two programs, the most significant difference pertains to income and resources.

Supplemental Security Income is a need-based program. Social Security Disability is based on your work credits. If you have a lot of resources, your SSDI claim won’t be impacted.

However, since SSI is income-based, your resources could impact your claim. Many SSI applicants find the rules about resources confusing. To clarify some of the most common misconceptions about resources, we compiled a list of tips and we’re sharing some of our best advice from the past 24 years.

What is a resource?

According to the SSA, a resource is something that you own, such as cash, bank accounts, land, life insurance, personal property, vehicles, and anything else you own that could be exchanged for cash.

SSI Resource Limits

If you’re single, the Social Security Administration states that you can’t have more than $2,000 in resources. However, not all resources count against you. We’ll explain more about resources that don’t count against you later. If you’re married, the limit is raised to $3,000. This is the same regardless of whether one or both spouses are disabled.

What Resources Don’t Count for SSI?

  • The house you live in
  • One vehicle, if it is used for transportation for you or a member of your household
  • Life insurance policies you own with a face value of $1,500 or less per person
  • Burial plots or spaces for you or your immediate family
  • A burial fund of up to $1,500 each for you and your spouse’s burial expenses
  • Household goods and personal effects
  • Property you or your spouse use in a trade or business, or on your job if you work for someone else
  • If you are disabled or blind, money or property you have set aside under a Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS)

If you are over the resource limit, you will not be eligible for SSI. Since SSI is based on need, many people won’t have to worry about a lot of the issues with resources.

However, because of how nuanced the SSA rules are pertaining to resources, it can be confusing. That’s one of the reasons why so many people seek the help of attorneys like Jan Dils, Attorneys at Law. We have the knowledge to help individuals navigate the Social Security maze.

Call us today for a free consultation. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you’d rather talk at a different time, fill out this form so our Intake team can schedule you for a later date.

 

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Long Term Disability and Your Social Security Disability Claim

POSTED BY Jon Corra . July 16, 2018

Working every day in Social Security can be en eye-opening experience. Some of the stats we’ve learned over the years are staggering. For instance, did you know 25% of all 20-year-olds won’t work until retirement age? In 2017, 39% of all working Americans had no money saved.

So, what are you to do if you can’t work? If you become disabled at an early age and you have no savings, it may be difficult to survive financially.

If you decide to pursue Social Security Disability, you’re going to be in for a long wait. Some people prepare for this by purchasing long-term disability insurance (LTD). However, individuals who have LTD may have questions about how it impacts Social Security Disability.

Let’s start with an explanation of long-term disability insurance. For most, an LTD policy will take place after a short-term disability policy ends. Most short-term policies last about 6 months. According to insure.com, long-term disability insurance pays a percentage of your salary, usually 50 to 60 percent, depending on the policy. The benefits last until you can go back to work or for the number of years stated in the policy. Some policies pay out as long as you are disabled until age 65.

Many employers offer LTD insurance policies, but you must opt into these policies. If your employer does not offer a plan, you can purchase LTD through an insurance agent. Most LTD policies require a monthly fee.

If you’ve done any research on the Social Security Disability process, you know that it takes a long time for claims to be approved. Most people have to wait years before they get approved. Long-term disability insurance can be beneficial during this time because it does not take as long for an LTD claim to process. So, LTD can help supplement your income while you’re waiting to be approved for SSDI.

Can you get both  SSDI and long-term disability policy? 

One of the first things we’re asked when a client has an LTD policy is “Can I get both?” The answer depends upon a few factors. Keep in mind, SSDI is not an income-based program. There are Many myths regarding Social Security. The SSA does not care how much money or how many assets you have when you’re pursuing SSDI.

You could have 27 houses and every Ferarri ever made and still qualify for SSDI. In other words, the income you receive from an LTD policy won’t keep you from receiving benefits. The limitations are usually found in your LTD policy. Some LTD policies require you to file for SSDI within a specific time period.

Once you’re approved for SSDI, most long-term disability policies won’t continue to pay you the full amount. Instead, the policy will offset the balance paid by the SSA.

For example, if you were making $60,000 per year before you became disabled, and your policy paid you 60% of your annual income, you’d receive about $2,500 per month. If you’re approved for SSDI for an amount of $1,800 per month, your LTD policy should pay you the remaining $700 per month. Keep in mind though, this depends upon your LTD policy. Some policies may not pay anything if you’re approved for SSDI.

Know your long-term disability policy.

Regardless of whether your employer offers an LTD policy or you purchase one from an agent, you should get to know it well. Don’t hesitate to ask your HR rep about specifics, or reach out to your insurance agent for clarification on the details.

If you’d like to know more about the ways in which SSDI impacts long-term disability, call us today for a free consultation. Our number is 1-877-526-3457. If you’d rather talk at a later time, fill out this form so we may call you at a better time.

How The New Medical Cards Will Impact You

POSTED BY Jon Corra . May 21, 2018

Individuals who receive Medicare are likely accustomed to paper cards, which can cause issues with information security. However, change is coming. Medicare recipients in West Virginia will be among the first individuals to receive the new cards. Here is what to expect:

Safety is paramount with the new Medical cards. The former paper cards featured your Social Security Number. This could be troublesome for many because it left important personal information exposed. The new Medical cards no longer feature an individual’s Social Security Number. Each new card will feature a new, unique Medicare Number. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will remove Social Security Numbers from all Medicare cards by 2019.

The new Medical cards will not be released at the same time to all Americans. Instead, they will be released in waves. West Virginia will be a part of the first wave released, which started in April of 2018. Other states included in wave one are Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and the District of Columbia.

The new Medical cards will be automatically sent via the United States Postal Service. Recipients won’t need to do anything to receive the new card. However, the CMS states that you should make sure your address is up to date. The CMS also states your benefits will not change with the new card. They also point out that the mailing will take time, and that your friends and neighbors may receive their cards before you do. The mail can be unpredictable, and the high volume of new cards being shipped can take a while to process.

Paper Medical Card

You may wonder why the Medical cards will remain paper. The simple reason is that, while a plastic card may be more durable, paper cards are easier for medical providers to make copies of. If you forget your card though, the provider may be able to look up your information by way of the new number.

If you’re in a Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO or PPO), your Medicare Advantage Plan ID card is your main card for Medicare—you should still keep and use it whenever you need care. However, you may also be asked to show your new Medicare card, so you should carry this card, too.

When you receive your new card, you should properly dispose of your old card. To see an example of the new card, click here.

If you’d like to know more about the services we offer, or if you’d like a free case evaluation, call us today. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form so we may call you at a better time.

5 Mistakes To Avoid When Pursuing A Mental Health Disability

POSTED BY Jon Corra . April 30, 2018

According to New York University’s Langone Medical Center, more than 8.3 million Americans ― or an estimated 3.4 percent of the adult population ― suffer from a serious mental health issue.

Many individuals pursue Social Security disability as a result of a mental illness. Some don’t believe that you can receive a favorable decision if you have a mental disability, but you can.

However, many Social Security disability claimants make mistakes when filing a claim with a mental disability as their condition. Our firm’s been representing individuals for more than two decades, and we recognize a lot of common mistakes that hinders you to win a disability case for mental illness.

 Pursuing A Mental Health Disability

In this blog, we identify 5 common mistakes individuals make in these claims:

1)Failing to receive a diagnosis of a mental health condition.

In order to receive a favorable decision based on a mental health claim or to win a disability case for mental illness, you must first be diagnosed by a medical professional.

The internet is vast and there are a lot of medical sites available. It’s easy to get lured into these sites and believe that we have a certain condition even if we haven’t seen a doctor.

Also, our family members are great at giving us opinions on conditions they believe we have, but until a medical professional gives you an official diagnosis, the Social Security Administration (SSA) won’t likely approve your claim based on an alleged

2)Not getting consistent treatment.

Receiving a diagnosis is only part of the battle. You must also seek consistent treatment. For instance, if you’ve been diagnosed with depression, you need to have additional medical evidence to show that you’re treating the condition.

Examples include attending therapy, taking prescribed medications, seeking alternative treatment like yoga or meditation, or even scheduling follow-up appointments with your doctor.

3)Only pursuing your mental disability when you have multiple conditions.

Mental disabilities are serious. However, one condition alone may not be enough for you to receive a favorable decision.

Let’s say you have depression, anxiety, and PTSD. You should pursue each of those claims if they all impact your ability to work.

Don’t just put all your eggs in one basket. Similarly, if you have mental disabilities and physical disabilities, you should pursue both types if they impact your ability to work.

If depression and a back condition keep you from working, it may be in your best interest to pursue both conditions on your disability application.

4)Failing to show how the mental health condition impacts your job.

Simply having a diagnosis of a condition does not necessarily mean that it will keep you from working. For instance, you may have a diagnosis of depression, but it may not impact your job.

Or maybe you’re able to manage your conditions with medication and it does not impact your job. You need evidence showing how your mental disability impacts your ability to work.

Did you miss a lot of work because of your psychological impairment? Do you to have problems dealing with the public? Are you only able to concentrate for small periods of time?  Do you avoid public places? These are just some of the examples of how mental health conditions can impact your job.

5)Giving up because you were denied, you still can apply to win a disability case for mental illness.

It’s no secret that most people get denied at least once or twice when pursuing a Social Security disability claim. There is a good chance your claim will be denied, too.

That does not mean that you should give up though. We’ve worked with a lot of clients who were denied at least once, and eventually received their favorable decision. Don’t give up.

 

Mental health conditions are serious and they need to be treated properly. If you’ve been struggling with a mental health condition, and you can’t work, give us a call today for a free consultation on how to win a disability case for mental illness

Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form so we can contact you at a better time.

Who Determines If I’m Disabled?

POSTED BY Jon Corra . April 23, 2018

We’ve been helping people get their Social Security disability benefits since 1994. That means we’re approaching our 25th year in business. In these 25 years, we have been asked many questions.  For instance, “Who determines if I am disabled?” This is a good question any individual pursuing Social Security disability should ask.

Although your treating physician may indicate that you are disabled, it’s not a guarantee that the Social Security Administration (SSA) will agree.  SSA will consider the information and determine the amount of weight they feel the doctor’s statement should have on the decision.

So, who does determine if you are disabled?  There is not a simple black and white answer to this question. Instead, there are infinite shades of grey that will eventually determine if you’re disabled or not. The SSA uses a five-step process to determine if an individual is approved for disability benefits.

 

Social Security Disability Process Steps

Step 1

The first step in the process to determine disability is simple: they will ask if you are currently working at the current SGA level. For those who may not be aware, SGA stands for Substantial Gainful Activity. The SSA states that SGA is as follows:

A person who is earning more than a certain monthly amount is ordinarily considered to be engaging in SGA. The amount of monthly earnings considered as SGA depends on the nature of a person’s disability.

The Social Security Act specifies a higher SGA amount for statutorily blind individuals; Federal regulations specify a lower SGA amount for non-blind individuals. Both SGA amounts generally change with changes in the national average wage index.

So, if you’re engaging in SGA, you will likely be denied at step 1 in the SSA process without SSA even looking at your medical evidence to determine disability.

Step 2

If you’re not engaging in SGA, your claim will proceed to step 2  to determine disability in the process: do you have a severe physical or mental impairment or combination of severe impairments?

SSA defines a severe impairment as an abnormality that causes more than a minimal effect on your ability to work.  SSA also requires that your impairment will cause such effect on your ability to work for 12 months or longer.

Social Security Disability Process  Step 3

If SSA deems your impairment(s) to be severe, your claim to determine disability will proceed to step 3: do you meet or equal a medical listing?  The SSA maintains a listing of medical criteria that are considered to be so severe that an individual is found to be disabled if his or her medically determinable physical or mental impairment(s) matches them.

If an individual has an impairment that meets or equals one of the listings and meets the duration requirement, he or she is found to be disabled. If an individual does not have an impairment that meets or equals one of the listings or the duration requirement is not met, the adjudicator goes to step 4.

Social Security Disability Process Step 4

Social Security considers many factors when determining if you’re disabled.

In step 4, the SSA will examine your prior work history to determine diability. Do the limitations associated with your disabilities keep you from doing the type of work you’ve performed in the past 15 years? This is where your doctor’s input becomes very important.

SSA is looking for more information than your doctor’s opinion that you are disabled and can no longer do your past work.  It is beneficial for your doctor to note what limitations you have because of your disabilities.

For example, how long can you sit, stand, walk, lift, and concentrate?  Would you need to elevate your legs and how often/for how long?  Can you interact with the public or with supervisors?  Would you need to be frequently retrained due to problems with concentration or memory loss?  Would you need extra breaks throughout the day and how often/for how long?

If your doctor does not note these types of limitations, the agency adjudicator will determine your limitations based on the information noted within your medical records.  Your doctor, who has probably evaluated you many times, is going to better know and understand your limitations than an adjudicator who is merely reading your medical records.

If it’s decided that your disability does keep you from working in the field you were formerly employed, the SSA will go on to the 5th and final step: can you do any other type of work?

At this point, the SSA wants to know if you will be able to work and achieve the SGA level in a field that differs from any of previous fields in which you were employed in the past 15 years.

This can get very complicated.  Your limitations, along with other vocational factors such as age, education and work experience, will be used to determine disability if you can work in jobs you haven’t done before.  If it is decided that you cannot do your past work or any other type of work, you will be deemed disabled by SSA.

If you believe you may be disabled and need some help with your claim, call us today for a free consultation. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk now, fill out this form so we can contact you at a better time.

Gulf War Presumptive Conditions

POSTED BY admin . April 18, 2018

Many Gulf War veterans across the U.S. have faced numerous health issues that have been called Gulf War Illness or Gulf War Syndrome. These conditions cause chronic fatigue, migraine headaches, joint pain, respiratory issues, memory recall problems, insomnia and dizziness.

Because of the widespread effect of these symptoms, the VA has established a policy for presumptive conditions that eliminate the need for a Gulf War Veteran to prove a connection between their military service and illnesses if the symptoms last for six months or longer. The VA will presume the problems are related to the Gulf War service time regardless of the cause.

What conditions does this include?

  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome – long-term, severe fatigue that is not remedied with rest and is not caused by another existing condition.
  • Fibromyalgia – widespread muscle pain that causes insomnia, stiffness, headaches and problems with memory.
  • Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders – chronic or continuing problems with any area of the gastrointestinal tract and can include irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia and functional abdominal pain syndrome.
  • Undiagnosed illnesses – conditions can include a wide array of problems such as abnormal weight loss, cardiovascular disease, neurological and psychological issues, rash or other skin problem, muscle and joint pain, menstrual disorder, respiratory disorders, fatigue, headaches and sleep problems.

What constitutes Gulf War service?

The Gulf War encompasses active military duty in the Southwest Asia Theater starting with the first Gulf War in August 1990 and including Operation Iraqi Freedom 2003 – 2010 and Operation New Dawn 2010 – 2011. The geographical locations of service include: Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, the neutral zone between Iraq and Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, Oman, the Gulf of Aden, the Gulf of Oman, the waters of the Persian Gulf, the Arabian Sea and the Red Sea and the airspace above these locations.

The attorneys at Jan Dils find great satisfaction in assisting veterans with their benefits. If you need help filing for presumptive VA benefits or appealing a claim related to presumptive conditions from the Gulf War, do not hesitate to call to schedule a free consultation.

Social Security Back Payments

POSTED BY admin . April 08, 2018

Social Security Back Payments: Because no one ever gets approved for disability benefits the exact day they become disabled, the SSA offers back payments for benefits. you must be eligible for Social Security back payment.

These payments typically come in a lumsocial-back-paymentsp sum amount for SSDI, while SSI back payments sometimes come in three SSI back payment installments.

The purpose of back payments is to compensate applicants for the benefits they’re entitled to for the time between applying and getting approved.

The SSA is overwhelmed by the amount of applications, so a long wait for approval is almost guaranteed.

The Factors affecting the Social Security benefits.

 

SSI vs SSDI

The way SSI pays past due payments is a little different from the way SSDI pays.

One of the main differences is that SSDI allows for retroactive benefits to be paid up to 12 months prior to the application being filed if an applicant was disabled prior to applying, while SSI does not.  

SSI back payments may be paid back to the application date, not before like SSDI. Also, large sums of back payments for SSI are typically split into three SSI back payment installments. Each installment is released in 6 month intervals.

Another difference in these payments is the 5 month waiting period for SSDI. A beneficiary of SSDI benefits is not eligible for payments during the first full 5 months following the onset of their disability.

For example, if an individual is found to be disabled as of 10/01/2016, retroactive benefits will only be paid back to March 1, 2018 which is the 6th month following the 5 month waiting period.                                                                                                                                            

The Amount of  Social Security Back Pay

Figuring out How Much Back Pay Will You Receive? will be can be simple but many factors are taken into consideration.

In theory, you can simply take the number of months between the date your back payments go back to and the month you are to receive your first payment and multiply that number by the amount you are to receive monthly.

However, you must keep in mind that income and other types of benefits could offset a monthly payment.

Therefore, using this equation will only be an estimate. It is best to fully review all award letters that you receive from SSA listing your monthly payments.

Speak directly to a representative at your local SSA office to answer any questions you have regarding any monthly payment that could be offset.

Call us today for a free consultation from our Social Security lawyers from North Carolina and West Virginia for Social Security Back Payments, SSI back payment installments and Social Security Direct Deposit consult. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457.

If you can’t talk right now, fill out this form, and a representative will call you at a more convenient time.

How Long after Your Social Security Payment Claim is Approved Should You Expect Payments?

POSTED BY Jon Corra . March 03, 2018

Social Security Payment :

Your Social Security Claim is finally approved after years of waiting. You’re probably relieved because the past few years have likely been stressful. So you’re Social Security in Payment Center and Processing Timefinally ready to relax. But, it’s been a while since you received your approval and you still haven’t received compensation or Social Security payment. So, what’s going on?

Don’t forget that you’re dealing with a government agency, and they have to deal with a lot of red tape. Granted, if you filed a social security claim, you are probably well aware of that by now.

I hate to waste time, and I love simple things. In my mind, if you are approved for your benefits, a few clicks of the mouse should send a check your way, but that is not how the SSA does things. In fact, there are a number of things you should know about the Social Security payment process after you’re approved.

First of all, the way in which Social Security payment are process starts our confusion. SSI payments are processed at your local SSA office. On the other hand, SSD payments are processed by way of National Processing Centers. These are generally pretty far away from people in rural areas.

For instance, our firm is based in Parkersburg, West Virginia. We frequently deal with the processing centers in Philadelphia and Baltimore. Obviously, they aren’t local, and they can have issues that we might not be aware of back here.

It’s also important to note that the SSA is a large organization housing many different departments. These departments are usually not in sync.

So, it makes total sense that you could receive a favorable decision, and not receive payment for 30 to 120 days. It also possible, but uncommon, that you could get a payment before you actually receive the decision. We see this more so in our VA Disability practice, but it is possible with social security too.

With social security, like most things in life, the less complicated the situation, the quicker it will be. If you just have a normal black and white social security claim, you likely won’t see many issues.

However, if you have a workers comp claim or retirement, or even if you’re getting both SSD and SSI, you’re more likely than not going to see delays.

We know how frustrating it can be at a time like this, but we’ve seen it a lot before, and we’ll likely see it more in the future. Once the processing is complete, the claimant will receive a Notice of Award letter detailing all the payment information such as monthly benefit amount, Social Security back payment amount owed, when monthly checks will start and how much was paid to the attorney, if you made use of one.

Finally, there are some miscellaneous items that can cause delays and social Security myths that disturbs you. For instance, if you were married or divorced during the time your claim was pending, this will likely cause a delay. The same is true if you returned to work during this same process. Delays should be expected there as well.

The disability process as a whole is very frustrating. It’s best not to fight it alone. That’s why so many people turn to the team at Jan Dils Attorneys at Law to get the benefits they deserve. From start to finish we have the people and the passion for getting you the benefits you deserve. Jan Dils has an excellent name as a Personal injury lawyer in WV as well.

Call us today for a free consultation from our Social Security lawyers from North Carolina And West Virginia. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you can’t talk right now, fill out this form, and a representative will call you at a more convenient time.

 

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