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Everything You Need to Know About RFC Forms

POSTED BY Jon Corra . October 02, 2018

One of the most important aspects to consider when pursuing a Social Security Disability claim is whether or not the individual making the claim is capable of working. One of the ways in which the Social Security Administration (SSA) evaluates your ability to work is via a Residual Functional Capacity Assessment, commonly known as an RFC.

Your impairment(s) and any related symptoms, such as pain, may cause physical and mental limitations that affect what you can do in a work setting. Your Residual Functional Capacity is the maximum amount of work you can still do despite your limitations. The Social Security Administration (SSA) will assess your Residual Functional Capacity based on all the relevant evidence in your case record.

For instance, if you have an issue with your back, the RFC will measure how much you can still do despite your back problems, such as how long you can stand, walk or sit, or how many pounds you can lift.

Your physical RFC determines whether you can be expected to do sedentary work, light work, or medium work. For instance, if your doctor has restricted you to walking and standing no more than two hours per day, your RFC will be for sedentary work. Here are the various exertional levels that could appear in your RFC:

  • Sedentary work. This means you have the ability to lift no more than 10 pounds at a time, and occasionally lift or carry things like files or small tools. A sedentary job requires the ability to sit for 6 hours out of your 8-hour work day and stand or walk for no more than 2 hours of your 8-hour work day.
  • Light work. This means you can lift up to 20 pounds occasionally, and frequently lift or carry up to 10 pounds. Light work requires the ability to stand or walk for 6 hours out of your 8-hour work day. If you can do light work, you can do sedentary work.
  • Medium work. This means you can lift up to 50 pounds at a time, and frequently lift or carry up to 25 pounds. Medium work requires the ability to stand or walk for 6 hours out of your 8-hour work day.  If you can do medium work, you can also do light and sedentary work.
  • Heavy work. This means you can lift up to 100 pounds at a time, and that you can frequently lift or carry up to 50 pounds. Heavy work requires the ability to stand or walk for 6 hours out of your 8-hour work day.  If you can do heavy work, you can do medium, light, or sedentary work.
  • Very heavy work. This means you can lift objects that weigh more than 100 pounds, and frequently lift or carry 50 pounds or more. Very heavy work requires the ability to stand or walk for 6 hours out of your 8-hour work day.  If you can do very heavy work, you can do all the other levels as well.

Your RFC will also include any non-exertional restrictions, such as not being able to stoop, bend, crawl, use your fingers, or remember instructions. Among non-exertional restrictions is your ability to function because of nervousness, anxiety, or depression.

This may seem confusing, especially if you’ve never filed a Social Security Disability claim before. It can be daunting to submit all of the forms, file appeals, and go to hearings. These are just some of the reasons why so many people turn to our team for help with their Disability claims. We’ve helped thousands get the disability benefits they deserve. If you’d like to know more about the services we offer, call us for a free consultation. Our toll-free number is 1-877-526-3457. If you’d rather talk at a later time, fill out this form. A member of our team will set up an appointment so you can talk to us at your convenience.

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